Summer Dreams

4

Something about spending time on a covered porch always leads me reminiscing and daydreaming. As the rain clears to make room for the summer sun, I spend hours out there, watching my dogs play and letting my mind float on the afternoon breeze, I remember, and I plan.

This beautiful weather makes me miss canoeing with Evan terribly. The sound of the water as our paddles slid through the gentle waves slowed my thoughts so I could exist in that moment, working in perfect synchronization with Evan. I especially loved our sunset excursions when the world we knew drifted off to sleep and another secret world began to stir, a nocturnal kingdom we could only glimpse before we lost the light and our way.

When I am cured, Evan and I will return right away to the water. We will buy a red canoe and name it Carlos, and he will take us on dozens of new adventures.

The other activity I am missing is something I only did once. I was shy and nervous, so I didn’t get up the nerve to try karaoke until rather late in the game. When I finally sang into that microphone, though, I was hooked. I especially loved singing duets with Evan (he makes everything at least ten times more fun). When I have my voice back, I am going to hit every karaoke bar in town!

Rag Doll

 

At the recommendation of ALS Worldwide 129147 and with the approval of my beloved neurologist, I have begun an unconventional course of medications. I use the word “unconventional” because some of the medicine is either not typically used in cases of ALS or is being used outside of the FDA approved dosing. Additionally, none of this is covered by insurance. Our hope is that the new protocol will better manage my symptoms and even gain back some of the strength and mobility I have lost.

I began taking quinine sulfate to manage my excruciating muscle cramps. Even though my mouth now constantly tastes of bitter tonic water, it’s worth it because I am getting near total relief.

I am taking Nuedexta three times a day rather than the standard two in order to better control my PseudoBulbar Affect, which causes involuntary fits of laughing and crying. We are seeing good results so far.

Next week, I begin daily injections of B12 into my arms and legs. I am not absorbing the B12 I ingest orally thanks to ALS messing with my blood-brain barrier, so we will be delivering it directly to my muscles. This should restore some of my strength and mobility.

And so it goes. We experiment to manage the untreatable, to keep me going by patching up the tears until I am more rag doll than woman. Still, as long as I am, I will be grateful.